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Pythagorean theorem (arbitrary triangle - obtuse angle)

Generalization of the Pythagorean theorem for the side opposite of the obtuse angle of an arbitrary triangle

... more

Relation between inradius,exradii and sides of a right triangle

Right triangle or right-angled triangle is a triangle in which one angle is a right angle (that is, a 90-degree angle). The incircle or inscribed circle of ... more

Sine function

The trigonometric functions (also called the circular functions) are functions of an angle. They relate the angles of a triangle to the lengths of its ... more

Bretschneider's formula - Area of a general quadrilateral

In geometry, Bretschneider’s formula is the shown expression for the area of a general quadrilateral.

A quadrilateral is a polygon with four ... more

Quadrilateral's length of the diagonals

A quadrilateral is a polygon with four sides (or edges) and four vertices or corners. The interior angles of a simple (and planar) quadrilateral add up to ... more

Radius of the incircle of a right triangle

Right triangle or right-angled triangle is a triangle in which one angle is a right angle (that is, a 90-degree angle). The incircle or inscribed circle ... more

Hyperbolic triangle ( length of the base)

A hyperbolic sector is a region of the Cartesian plane {(x,y)} bounded by rays from the origin to two points (a, 1/a) and (b, 1/b) and by the hyperbola xy ... more

Hyperbolic triangle ( length of the altitude)

A hyperbolic sector is a region of the Cartesian plane {(x,y)} bounded by rays from the origin to two points (a, 1/a) and (b, 1/b) and by the hyperbola xy ... more

Right Triangle (sides)

A right triangle (American English) or right-angled triangle (British English) is a triangle in which one angle is a right angle (that is, a 90-degree ... more

Cyclic quadrilateral (Length of the diagonal opposite angle A)

In Euclidean geometry, a cyclic quadrilateral or inscribed quadrilateral is a quadrilateral whose vertices all lie on a single circle. This circle is ... more

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