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Synodic Period

The orbital period is the time taken for a given object to make one complete orbit around another object.When mentioned without further qualification in ... more

Geosynchronous orbit

A geosynchronous orbit (sometimes abbreviated GSO) is an orbit around the Earth with an orbital period of one sidereal day ... more

Apsidal precession

In celestial mechanics, apsidal precession is the precession (gradual rotation) of the line connecting the apsides (line of apsides) of an astronomical ... more

Kepler's Third Law

In astronomy, Kepler’s laws of planetary motion are three scientific laws describing the motion of planets around the Sun.

1.The orbit of a ... more

Mean Orbital Speed

The orbital speed of a body, generally a planet, a natural satellite, an artificial satellite, or a multiple star, is the speed at which it orbits around ... more

Orbital Period - Ellipse

In astrodynamics or celestial mechanics an elliptic orbit is a Kepler orbit with the eccentricity less than 1; this includes the special case of a circular ... more

Dermott's Law

Dermott’s law is an empirical formula for the orbital period of major satellites orbiting planets in the Solar System. It was identified by the ... more

Planet Formation Equation - "Clearing the neighbourhood"

“Clearing the neighbourhood around its orbit” is a criterion for a celestial body to be considered a planet in the Solar System. This was one ... more

Kepler's Third Law - modern formulation

In astronomy, Kepler’s laws of planetary motion are three scientific laws describing the motion of planets around the Sun.

1.The orbit of a ... more

Planck's relation

Electrons can only gain and lose energy by jumping from one allowed orbit to another, absorbing or emitting electromagnetic radiation with a frequency ... more

Mean anomaly - function of mean longitude

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

Langarian point (radius around M2 in the absense of M1)

In celestial mechanics, the Lagrangian points (also Lagrange points, L-points, or libration points) are positions in an orbital configuration of two large ... more

Mean anomaly

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

Mean anomaly at epoch

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

True anomaly

In astronomy, Kepler’s laws of planetary motion are three scientific laws describing the motion of planets around the Sun.

1- The orbit of ... more

Mean anomaly - function of gravitational parameter

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

Kepler's Second Law

In astronomy, Kepler’s laws of planetary motion are three scientific laws describing the motion of planets around the Sun.

1.The orbit of a ... more

Heliocentric distance

In astronomy, Kepler’s laws of planetary motion are three scientific laws describing the motion of planets around the Sun.

1- The orbit of ... more

Kepler's Third Law - with Radial Acceleration

In astronomy, Kepler’s laws of planetary motion are three scientific laws describing the motion of planets around the Sun.

1.The orbit of a ... more

Kepler's First Law

In astronomy, Kepler’s laws of planetary motion are three scientific laws describing the motion of planets around the Sun.

1.The orbit of a ... more

Electron orbit radius

In atomic physics, the Rutherford–Bohr model or Bohr model, depicts the atom as a small, positively charged nucleus surrounded by electrons that travel in ... more

Free-fall time (radial trajectory of an ellipse with an eccentricity of 1 and semi-major axis R/2)

The free-fall time is the characteristic time that would take a body to collapse under its own gravitational attraction, if no other forces existed to ... more

Electron's energy

n atomic physics, the Rutherford–Bohr model or Bohr model, depicts the atom as a small, positively charged nucleus surrounded by electrons that travel in ... more

Solar luminosity

is a unit of radiant flux (power emitted in the form of photons) conventionally used by astronomers to measure the luminosity of stars. It is defined in ... more

Electron's speed at any radius

The electrons can only orbit stably, without radiating, in certain orbits at a certain discrete set of distances from the nucleus. These orbits are ... more

Period of Precession - (Torque-induced - Classical Newtonian)

Precession is a change in the orientation of the rotational axis of a rotating body. In an appropriate reference frame it can be defined as a change in the ... more

Gravity Acceleration by Altitude

The gravity of Earth, which is denoted by g, refers to the acceleration that the Earth imparts to objects on or near its surface due to gravity. In SI ... more

Orbital Eccentricity

The orbital eccentricity of an astronomical object is a parameter that determines the amount by which its orbit around another body deviates from a perfect ... more

Orbital Eccentricity - gravitational force

The orbital eccentricity of an astronomical object is a parameter that determines the amount by which its orbit around another body deviates from a perfect ... more

Graveyard Orbit - Minimum Perigee Altitude

A graveyard orbit, also called a junk orbit or disposal orbit, is a supersynchronous orbit that lies significantly above synchronous orbit, where ... more

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