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Pearson's moment coefficient of skewness

In probability theory and statistics, skewness is a measure of the asymmetry of the probability distribution of a real-valued random variable about its ... more

Pearson's moment coefficient of kurtosis (excess kurtosis)

In probability theory and statistics, kurtosis is any measure of the “tailedness” of the probability distribution of a real-valued random ... more

Period of Precession - (Torque-induced - Classical Newtonian)

Precession is a change in the orientation of the rotational axis of a rotating body. In an appropriate reference frame it can be defined as a change in the ... more

Precession - (Torque-induced - Classical Newtonian)

Precession is a change in the orientation of the rotational axis of a rotating body. In an appropriate reference frame it can be defined as a change in the ... more

Exponential decay

A quantity is said to be subject to exponential decay if it decreases at a rate proportional to its value. If the decaying quantity, N(t), is the number of ... more

Gyromagnetic ratio for a classical rotating body

In physics, the gyromagnetic ratio (also sometimes known as the magnetogyric ratio in other disciplines) of a particle or system is the ratio of its ... more

Cantilever Euler Beam - Maximum Displacement

Euler–Bernoulli beam theory (also known as engineer’s beam theory or classical beam theory) is a simplification of the linear theory of elasticity ... more

Precession (Torque-free)

Precession is a change in the orientation of the rotational axis of a rotating body. In an appropriate reference frame it can be defined as a change in the ... more

Motor constant

The constant K_M (motor size constant) is a value used to describe characteristics of electrical motors.

The motor constant is winding independent ... more

Horizontal Curve - Degree of curve

Aside from momentum, when a vehicle makes a turn, two forces are acting upon it. The first is gravity, which pulls the vehicle toward the ground. The ... more

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