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Speed

In everyday use and in kinematics, the speed of an object is the magnitude of its velocity (the rate of change of its position); it is thus a scalar ... more

Chebychev–Grübler–Kutzbach criterion (simple closed chain)

The Chebychev–Grübler–Kutzbach criterion determines the degree of freedom of a kinematic chain, that is, a coupling of rigid bodies by means of mechanical ... more

Chebychev–Grübler–Kutzbach criterion (single open chain)

The Chebychev–Grübler–Kutzbach criterion determines the degree of freedom of a kinematic chain, that is, a coupling of rigid bodies by means of mechanical ... more

Frequency (Doppler effect for a moving black body)

Black-body radiation is the thermal electromagnetic radiation within or surrounding a body in thermodynamic equilibrium with its environment, or emitted by ... more

Critical Speed of a Rotating Shaft - Rayleigh–Ritz method

In solid mechanics, in the field of rotordynamics, the critical speed is the theoretical angular velocity that excites the natural frequency of a rotating ... more

Compound machines (mechanical advantage)

A compound machine is a machine formed from a set of simple machines connected in series with the output force of one providing the input force to the ... more

Current gain - simplified formula (for equal impedances)

The current gain can be calculated using current instead of power using Joule’s first law to calculate. In many cases, the input and output ... more

Lotka's Law

Lotka’s law, named after Alfred J. Lotka, is one of a variety of special applications of Zipf’s law. It describes the frequency of publication ... more

Tractive Force - Steam locomotives

As used in mechanical engineering, the term tractive force can either refer to the total traction a vehicle exerts on a surface, or the amount of the total ... more

Voltage gain - simplified formula (for equal impedances)

The power gain can be calculated using voltage instead of power using Joule’s first law to calculate a voltage gain. In many cases, the input and ... more

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