'

Search results

Found 1153 matches
Flight path angle (elliptic orbit)

In astrodynamics an elliptic orbit is a Kepler orbit with the eccentricity less than 1; this includes the special case of a circular orbit, with ... more

Horizontal Curve - Degree of curve

Aside from momentum, when a vehicle makes a turn, two forces are acting upon it. The first is gravity, which pulls the vehicle toward the ground. The ... more

Relation between the inradius and exradii of an equilateral triangle

an equilateral triangle is a triangle in which all three sides are equal. In traditional or Euclidean geometry, equilateral triangles are also equiangular; ... more

Cycloid ( parametric equation Y-coordinate)

A cycloid is the curve traced by a point on the rim of a circular wheel as the wheel rolls along a straight line without slippage. It is an example of a ... more

Cycloid ( parametric equation X- coordinate)

A cycloid is the curve traced by a point on the rim of a circular wheel as the wheel rolls along a straight line without slippage. It is an example of a ... more

Hyperbolic Kepler equation

In orbital mechanics, Kepler’s equation relates various geometric properties of the orbit of a body subject to a central force.

It was first ... more

Radius of Inertial circle ( by Coriolis effect)

In physics, the Coriolis effect is a deflection of moving objects when they are viewed in a rotating reference frame.
An air or water mass moving with ... more

Nodal Precession

Nodal precession is the precession of an orbital plane around the rotation axis of an astronomical body such as Earth. This precession is due to the ... more

Perimeter of a Regular polygon

A regular polygon is a polygon that is equiangular (all angles are equal in measure) and equilateral (all sides have the same length). Regular polygons may ... more

Tangential quadrilateral ( the sum of the opposite sides)

In Euclidean geometry, a tangential quadrilateral (sometimes just tangent quadrilateral) or circumscribed quadrilateral is a convex quadrilateral whose ... more

...can't find what you're looking for?

Create a new formula