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London penetration depth

In superconductors, the London penetration depth (usually denoted as λ or λ_L) characterizes the distance to which a magnetic field penetrates into a ... more

Child's Law - related to anode voltage

First proposed by Clement D. Child in 1911, Child’s law states that the space-charge limited current (SCLC) in a ... more

Joule's first law

Joule heating , is the process by which the passage of an electric current through a conductor releases heat. Joule heating is depending on the resistance ... more

Planck's relation

Electrons can only gain and lose energy by jumping from one allowed orbit to another, absorbing or emitting electromagnetic radiation with a frequency ... more

Faraday's 1st Law of Electrolysis

The mass of a substance altered at an electrode during electrolysis is directly proportional to the quantity of electricity transferred at that electrode. ... more

Power gain

In electronics, gain is a measure of the ability of a two-port circuit (often an amplifier) to increase the power or amplitude of a signal from the input ... more

Photoelectric Effect - max kinetic energy of an ejected electron

The photoelectric effect is the observation that many metals emit electrons when light shines upon them. Electrons emitted in this manner may be called ... more

Drift Velocity

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains in a material due to an electric field. It can also be referred to ... more

Electron's speed at any radius ( related to the energy level)

Electrons in atoms orbit the nucleus. The electrons can only orbit stably, without radiating, in certain orbits (called by Bohr the “stationary ... more

Perfectly inelastic collision

A collision is an isolated event in which two or more moving bodies (colliding bodies) exert forces on each other for a relatively short time. Collision is ... more

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